Vimeo Announces Open Platform For Creators To Earn Money From Their Videos

Vimeo to offer Creators Two Flexible Payment Options

Vimeo® today announced two new features that enable creators to earn money from their films and videos. Available now, Tip Jar allows viewers to show their appreciation to creators by voluntarily contributing money to support their work.  Over the next several months, Vimeo will also roll out an open pay-to-view service that allows creators to sell their work behind a paywall.

Vimeo’s focus on quality and creativity has allowed it to become one of the Web’s top 10 distributors of video online [1] with more than 75 million monthly unique visitors [2] and one of the world’s largest creative networks with over 13 million registered members. Vimeo’s introduction of Tip Jar and its upcoming pay-to-view service provide a clear path for video creators to build businesses around the films and videos they create.

“Empowering creators to make money from their videos is a logical next step for Vimeo as a service and an opportunity to expand the overall marketplace for video creators and viewers,” said Vimeo CEO Kerry Trainor.  “Established creators and emerging talent alike can connect directly with their audiences without the need to conform to industry standards around video format, price or timing releases.”

Vimeo’s Tip Jar enables video creators to crowdsource funds to support works directly from their viewers. Tip Jar will allow anyone to give tips before, during or after watching a video; Vimeo will pay 85 percent of the gross revenue to the creator. Starting today, Vimeo Plus or Pro members can choose to activate Tip Jar.

Vimeo’s pay-to-view service will be an open platform for video creators to sell access to their films and videos. Expanding on traditional rental and Video On Demand models, Vimeo’s pay-to-view service gives creators customizable options to sell their films and video content directly to their audiences and provide control over pricing, rental duration distribution location and other settings. Vimeo will begin rolling out its pay-to-view service in beta preview this fall with a curated series of films.  Vimeo will make the pay-to-view service available to all Vimeo PRO subscribers in early 2013.

“Creators have asked us for quite some time to help them monetize their work, but we think it needed an approach that put the controls back into the hands of the creators themselves,” said Dae Mellencamp, President of Vimeo. “We designed these tools to allow video creators to be as flexible as possible while providing the ability to financially succeed at various levels of viewership.”

For more information about Vimeo’s new creator monetization tools, please visit https://vimeo.com/blog/post:523 or watch https://vimeo.com/49684456.

About Vimeo

Vimeo® is the home for high-quality videos and the people who love them. Vimeo’s mission is to empower and inspire people around the world to create, share and discover videos. As one of the world’s largest creative networks, Vimeo reaches a global audience of more than 75MM each month. Founded in 2004 and based in New York City, Vimeo, LLC is a subsidiary of IAC (NASDAQ: IACI)

[1] June 2012 Comscore

[2] August 2012 Vimeo Internal via Google Analytics

What Is The Great Hope For The Future Of Cinema?

Or for that matter, what do you think can really change and move things forward in both the near and distant future? If we could ask five key people what they saw on our various horizons, what would they show us? Who should we ask?  One of the great things about being pointed in a direction, is that it is almost a path. Could we have walked down that road when Francis Ford Coppola predicted YouTube in 1991:

It is not easy to just boil down to one specific all the various change that is swarming over us at this point.  I see major shifts coming in so many different aspects of cinema: discovery, consideration, value/return, participation, collaboration, transitioning, immersion, and many others. The fact that this far down the road of a connected culture we have not wed social and content together may speak of the resistance to change, but also of the tidal wave that will one day hit us. That all said, I think that all of us -- creators, appreciators, entrepreneurs, & passive audiences members, are going to truly be best served by another aspect all together.

If you ask me, one of the big next changes and TGHFTFOC (see title) is the end of the dominance of the feature film form. Now don't get me wrong: I love feature films more than any other manufactured entity. I have devoted my labor to the creation, enhancement, and appreciation of the form. I just see many trends leading to feature-length linear-narrative passive-engagement work's decreasing relevance, along with many indications that it won't be a bad thing when all participants in both the film industry and culture look at a far widening realm of creation, participation, and consumption.

Perhaps though it is that the end of dominance of the feature film form is a symptom of something even greater. Or maybe it is just another chicken vs. egg paradox. Regardless, the industry and culture are both waking to and adopting a move from a one-off paradigm where each new creative work requires reinventing the wheel and instead embracing both a business model and community focus on an ongoing conversation between the story world initiators and those that engage with it. This abandonment of requiring each new tale to be able to not just stand but forever sprint on its own two feet is not only logical and practical but offers many new opportunities.

I eventually will go in to far greater detail on this (particularly when I can find the time to do so), but want to get this conversation moving forward. I wonder why it is still only the outliers who are in this discussion.

Still for now, we can surely see the benefit of expanding our scripts to include a series of narrative & character extensions. We recognize that each work represents an opportunity for collaborations that we have yet to dream of. We can empower those without traditional access to work with us on building previously neglected connections and launch pads. Our stories and fantasies do not need to begin or end with our renderings but can foster new works and continual creation. We can combat the challenges of living in an era of super-abundance and non-filters by championing greater value in community focus.

The easy way is a path to irrelevance. Temporally manipulative, crowd-based consumptive,  audio-visually focused content stopped long ago as being both the art form and entertainment outlet most indicative of our time. The new form is all of that and more. It won't only reflect our era, but lead us into a better world. And it starts with saying good bye to the cultural & economic dominance of antiquated concept.  

Is There A Possibility For Brand & Content Collaboration?

Can we move beyond product placement for a collaboration between those that fund the production and those that create stories?  Can it be done without compromising the integrity of the work.  Steve Wax and I wrote a blog discussion about this last year and I recently stumbled across this video of Steve and I.

 

 

Video: How The Film Industry Has Changed & Where It Is Going

I gave this interview for the film "PressPausePlay" a couple of years back. It premiered at SxSW earlier this year. I would say it a bit differently today, but the sentiment and bullet points remain the same. I must admit I am a bit surprised, but how much I still say is exactly the same today.

We are still looking for an audience-friendly term for immersive transmedia cross-platform creation. I remain restless to abandon this single product impulse-buy centered entertainment economy.

It's a short clip. I rev up as it goes on, so give it the time to reach the end. I feel it grows quite hopeful. Good work will come out of today's problems.

I look forward to watching all the PressPausePlay clips they have put on YouTube.

Prescreen Debuts as a Social Movie Discovery Platform

Prescreen was featured on our MUST READ list of the New Platforms. Sheri Candler also did an overview for the community on this site. Now they are launching. Their press release is below, but to understand just what they are doing, watch this short video before.

Are you excited? I'm excited.

Prescreen Debuts as a Social Movie Discovery Platform

Prescreen will embrace a curated daily email service to leverage the social web to give movies blockbuster exposure on an indie budget

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – September 14th, 2011 -- Prescreen, an innovative movie marketing and distribution platform, will officially launch today to give filmmakers and distributors an alternative to traditional advertising and distribution channels – through the mass marketing of curated content that is then shared by users through social media.

Prescreen offers users the ability to subscribe to a daily email alert, view trailers and rent movies to stream on demand, as well as earn rewards and discounts for sharing movie information on their social networks. Their daily email service highlights one movie per day, enabling their featured films to reach a wide audience.

Prescreen also delivers a Prescreen Performance Report to each filmmaker and distributor whose movie is featured on Prescreen. The report offers aggregated analytics and demographics about the audience for each featured film.

How it Works: • Consumer subscribers receive an email alert featuring one new movie each day. • Users watch the movie trailer for free and can purchase a rental to view the entire movie to stream on demand for up to 60 days. • Users can earn discounts and rewards by sharing the film through their social networks using Facebook, Twitter, etc. • Prescreen aggregates the purchasing data, protecting the privacy of each user, and delivers valuable demographic and analytic information back to filmmakers and distributors for future marketing and distribution efforts.

Prescreen’s intuitive marketing report includes all of the relevant information from the purchasers, allowing the content owner to use the detailed information to make informed decisions about continued distribution and marketing efforts. Prescreen allows content owners to maximize profits by marketing and selling via the Prescreen platform.

“Movie goers are increasingly consuming premium content through new digital channels including downloads, streaming, and video on demand (VOD), generating new revenue streams for the movie industry,” said Shawn Bercuson, CEO and Founder of Prescreen. “Prescreen will help movies of all shapes and sizes receive the love they deserve by leveraging the social tools that exist today to market and distribute movies more efficiently.” One of Prescreen’s first films will be Kino Lorber’s “The Robber;” a story of a champion marathoner who leads a double life as a serial bank robber, sprinting between heists and escaping from police in epic chase sequences. The film was directed by Austrian director Benjamin Heisenberg and features a riveting central performance by Andreas Lust (Revanche).

“Prescreen has developed an exciting and innovative digital platform for film distribution, and we are happy to be one of their first content providers,” said Richard Lorber, CEO of Kino Lorber. “We have one of the largest, most essential libraries in the United States and with Prescreen’s curatorial team so committed to high quality cinema it was a natural fit. In this rapidly changing digital distribution landscape, increasing market penetration means thinking outside the box –which is exactly why we're working with them.”

Prescreen is now accepting full-length feature film applications on a variety of topics and genres. To submit, visit: prescreen.com/submit. To sign up for the daily email service, visit: prescreen.com

About Prescreen Prescreen is a movie marketing and distribution platform that helps filmmakers and distributors efficiently reach audiences they otherwise would not have the ability to reach, and identify which audiences would provide maximum opportunity for continued growth and revenue. Prescreen offers users the ability to subscribe to email alerts, view trailers and stream movies on demand, as well as earn rewards for sharing movie information on their social networks. Visit prescreen.com for more information.

Allow Me To Take YOU To Venice To Experience DARK HORSE

It's pretty crazy how fast everything moves these days. We are able to leap countries and time to find what we missed continents away. Today DARK HORSE has it's press and industry screening in Toronto. Tomorrow is the North American Premiere. But I know how to make you feel like you are with us. Let me take you to Venice...

My flight out of Venice was evidently the only one that left for the United States on Tuesday. Our film DARK HORSE premiered there to a very nice standing ovation the night before. I arrive here to find interviews and press conference clips already up online. Check it out (and of course I rant a little bit). You even get to see the photo call and a NEW clip at the end!

Want more press conference? More Todd? There's a bit of a spoiler in this one, although it is more philosophical spoiler than actual content.

You really should have been with us on the red carpet. I couldn't resist photographing a smooch with my wife there, and well, "they" caught it:

Even our entrance at the screening is posted.

If it is specifics you want, here's Selma Blair talking about working with Todd:

Jordan Gelber offers up his view of the collaboration with Mr. Solondz (6.5 min) and then Selma adds a bit more of her perspective (6 min.):

I am sure there is more to find. But I have to say there's a particular pleasure getting to relive your pleasures moments after you've had them.

Video: The Art Of Immersion - How The Digital Generation Is Remaking Hollywood

A little while ago I got to participate in a great discussion at Google, centered around Frank Rose's must-read book The Art Of Immersion. Joining Frank and I were Chris Di Cesare, Director of Creative Programming at Google Creative Lab, i Paul Woolmington, Founding Partner of Naked Communications, and Susan Bonds of 42 Entertainment. If you want to know where it is all headed, I suggest you read Frank's book and listen to our talk, posted below.

Video: Christine Vachon Does A Good Ted Hope Impression

Christine Vachon recently had a talk with Anthony Kaufman at the NewFest Visionary Award presentation and had many interesting things to say about her career, producing, and indie film -- all that plus a lovely impression of yours truly.

The interview is a wealth of good advice. Add this video to your film school curriculum. Scott Macauley has selected some of his favorite quotes for you. And IW's own, Anthony Kaufman -- who moderated the event, gave a nice brief of the discussion, here.

Video: Spike Jonze, Lisa Cholodenko, and me on Financing and The Rule Of The Samurai

Spike, Lisa, and I got to have a great conversation at The Cleveland Public Library early this year, and a great crowd came. An official video was shot of the proceedings and hopefully will be available shortly, but this one came from the crowd, and is a nice little nugget to wet your appetite.

Dennis Potter & Adam Curtis On Rupert Murdoch

The brilliant Dennis Potter had one dying wish... (hat tip to Dan McGuire again!)

The equally brilliant Adam Curtis lays out Mr. Murdoch's path to becoming the Supreme Satan. (hat tip to MovieCityNews again!)

Dennis Potter and Adam Curtis have brought so much joy and pleasure to my world. And I leave their work always feeling stronger, smarter, fuller. I can't say the same for Mr. Murdoch...

What Is The Future Of The Film?

On Tuesday last week Brian Newman and I conducted a conversation on the topic of "The Future Of Film" at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival. I had an extra shot of espresso and we spoke for over an hour. You can re-live 8 minutes of it and see just how revved up I can get on this topic. There's a lot more to say about this subject. Brian said some of that here.

Private Film Festival: Chris Wiatt's DUPE

I have been planning a mini-fest of my own: six features, six scripts, one weekend. As I write this I have eleven to go. I just added one short to the list. Howard Gertler tipped me to Chris Wiatt's short DUPE as an example of good low bud use of VFX where the storytelling doesn't suffer due to the use of the incredible tools now available. I am glad he did. Check it out.

Your Second Chance: New Faces Of NYC Indie Film Video

We had a packed house at Lincoln Center for our "New Faces Of NYC Indie Film" panel. It was a good conversation. Sure, my game show idea did not work out, but hey, when you have eleven people up on the stage with you, it means you have eleven people not talking and that's hard to keep it lively. Luckily, all eleven people had a lot to say and are clearly a group of passionate and committed filmmakers, making sacrifices for the privilege of making their art. If you didn't get there, now through the miraculous power of the internet, you can give us two hours of your time and see what it is you missed.

Watch live streaming video from innovent at livestream.com

And yes, both I and Lincoln Center know, that this panel is very white, young, and generally male and probably straight -- and thus not truly representative of the diversity of talented filmmakers in our city. The Film Society of Lincoln Center has to be acknowledged (and praised) for what may well be the most diverse programming in the world -- this panel excluded. This panel evolved out of an initial idea to focus on new collaborative teams and that was shaping the "casting". It's not an excuse, just an effort to provide context. Of course, we can do better. And I will.

"An Amazing Time To Be A Storyteller"

Lance Weiler was the Keynote speaker at the Darklight Festival recently. He shares his journey into transmedia and why he is so optimistic about the world before us. It is nothing short of a state of the union address on Transmedia -- both how we got here and where we are. It includes a pretty solid survey of transmedia projects. Check out his video below if you are one of those types who actually want to know the world you are living in (and not just the one that once was).

Thomas Mai On Today's New Film Business

Have you heard Thomas Mai's presentation on Social Media and what it means to the film business? I had the good fortune to witness it this past summer, and thus am very happy that it is now up on the web for you all to benefit from. Thomas used to run Trust Film Sales which handled Lars Von Triers' films and many others. These days he generally travels and spreads the social media gospel for the filmmaking set. The full presentation runs an hour, but frankly if you are reading this now, you must take the time this weekend to make sure you are up to speed. I am sure you will be glad you did. Thomas starts things off with a video on the rise of Social Media. Even if you've seen this before, it still is stunning. His lecture begins about four minutes in. I am eager to hear your thoughts on this.

Thomas Mai Presentation ETMA, Strasbourg from Thomas Mai on Vimeo.

So what do you think?

We Are On The Verge Of A New Creative Culture

We are! We are! We are! Here' s the proof. I got to participate in PressPausePlay, a documentary that will be premiering at SXSW and seems to have covered a wide array of the disruptive voices pushing out of the past into this bright glorious future. Truly free film will find it's compatriots in all other forms as the audience becomes the creators and the barriers between all sectors break down. Check out what is to come next...

A Cardboard Hope: (Sweded) Star Wars

Michel Gondry has changed culture many times over.  His Lego video may be the greatest video ever.  And his Rubik's Cube series are among the YouTube Hall of Fame.  I look forward to the day when "Sweded" films take over from the corporate.  Homemade always tastes better.  This Star Wars trumps any thing Lucas did after the first three (and that is the TRUE first three, not the alternately titled first three).  And the soundtrack ranks with John Williams' best work.