When Will The Film Business Adjust To Reality?

I have given a few interviews around my new mission as the San Francisco Film Society's Executive Director.  I recently spoke to Cinesource and we discussed a bit about where we are now and where we could hopefully go.  It is always such a challenge because the existing businesses are invested in the status quo -- even when that is predicated on propping up a world that is no longer here.

I said: "The business of film has been oriented around the concepts of scarcity and control—where 50,000 titles can come out every year," Ted points out. "It would take nearly a century to [showcase] just a single year's output of films.” 

“The film industry has not been able to keep up with what the tech industry has brought to the forefront. The business has been stuck in ways of doing things that are not good for business. Transformations need to occur to create a sustainable investment class to continue to help filmmakers market to the new niches.” 

Hope would like to see business practices around scarcity make way for a “super abundance” of quality content, a super niche content world, where filmmakers can market freely to that special someone fascinated by their subject and style, although he admitted that engaging with communities is not a frictionless practice yet.

Read the whole interview here.

The Entertainment Economy Is Completely Different Than It Was

Make no mistake: The Entertainment Economy can no longer be predicated on scarcity or control -- as it has been for the last 110 years.  We need to rebuild it around concept of super-abundance & access.

"YouTubers Upload 72 Hours of Video Every Minute"  That's up from 48 hours a year ago.  At what age do we reach Saturation Point?  I already have: I have identified every film I would like to see -- if I am able to maintain my maximum rate of consumption -- to carry me 5 years past my life expectancy.  The very nature of technology indicates that in less than ten years, a twenty year old cinephile will have done the same.  I expect that to happen much sooner though.  Audiences will have no "need" for the new.  We have so many cute animals and children doing silly things after all.  Who really needs an ambitious and relevant cinema?  So why do anything to preserve it (let alone advance it)?  Let's just bury our heads and try to hold onto what is left of our jobs.  Right?

I am glad there are those that know otherwise.