Vimeo Announces Open Platform For Creators To Earn Money From Their Videos

Vimeo to offer Creators Two Flexible Payment Options

Vimeo® today announced two new features that enable creators to earn money from their films and videos. Available now, Tip Jar allows viewers to show their appreciation to creators by voluntarily contributing money to support their work.  Over the next several months, Vimeo will also roll out an open pay-to-view service that allows creators to sell their work behind a paywall.

Vimeo’s focus on quality and creativity has allowed it to become one of the Web’s top 10 distributors of video online [1] with more than 75 million monthly unique visitors [2] and one of the world’s largest creative networks with over 13 million registered members. Vimeo’s introduction of Tip Jar and its upcoming pay-to-view service provide a clear path for video creators to build businesses around the films and videos they create.

“Empowering creators to make money from their videos is a logical next step for Vimeo as a service and an opportunity to expand the overall marketplace for video creators and viewers,” said Vimeo CEO Kerry Trainor.  “Established creators and emerging talent alike can connect directly with their audiences without the need to conform to industry standards around video format, price or timing releases.”

Vimeo’s Tip Jar enables video creators to crowdsource funds to support works directly from their viewers. Tip Jar will allow anyone to give tips before, during or after watching a video; Vimeo will pay 85 percent of the gross revenue to the creator. Starting today, Vimeo Plus or Pro members can choose to activate Tip Jar.

Vimeo’s pay-to-view service will be an open platform for video creators to sell access to their films and videos. Expanding on traditional rental and Video On Demand models, Vimeo’s pay-to-view service gives creators customizable options to sell their films and video content directly to their audiences and provide control over pricing, rental duration distribution location and other settings. Vimeo will begin rolling out its pay-to-view service in beta preview this fall with a curated series of films.  Vimeo will make the pay-to-view service available to all Vimeo PRO subscribers in early 2013.

“Creators have asked us for quite some time to help them monetize their work, but we think it needed an approach that put the controls back into the hands of the creators themselves,” said Dae Mellencamp, President of Vimeo. “We designed these tools to allow video creators to be as flexible as possible while providing the ability to financially succeed at various levels of viewership.”

For more information about Vimeo’s new creator monetization tools, please visit https://vimeo.com/blog/post:523 or watch https://vimeo.com/49684456.

About Vimeo

Vimeo® is the home for high-quality videos and the people who love them. Vimeo’s mission is to empower and inspire people around the world to create, share and discover videos. As one of the world’s largest creative networks, Vimeo reaches a global audience of more than 75MM each month. Founded in 2004 and based in New York City, Vimeo, LLC is a subsidiary of IAC (NASDAQ: IACI)

[1] June 2012 Comscore

[2] August 2012 Vimeo Internal via Google Analytics

"7 Reasons To Release Your Film For Free"

guest post by Todd Sklar

A few weeks ago, my good friend Dean Peterson emailed me about releasing his film Incredibly Small for free on the internet. In full disclosure; he was emailing me not because I know a great deal about releasing movies on the interner (I don't), but because I was a producer on the film, and had been assisting with the film's release over the past year.

Flashing forward for a second; we went through with it, and thanks to the kind folks at Vimeo, you can now watch Incredibly Small on-line for free at the following link -- www.vimeo.com/40112752 -- As of this posting, the film has been viewed by over 31,000 people in less than a week. And at no cost to them, as well as no cost to us.

Back to Dean's original email -- my initial response was "YES! Let's definitely put it on the internet for free", which was quickly followed by; "But once we do that, it's like, on the Internet and shit, so we should make sure that's what you really wanna do. Cause that's essentially putting the curtains down so to speak on any other release plans we might have."

He said that it was, and my final email said; "I love it. Let's do it. But just for posterity's sake, gimme one good reason as to why we're doing this. So that we have something to put on the epitaph if for no other reason."

This was his reply;

You want one good reason? How 'bout 7...

1. I'm supremely bored by most of the traditional routes people have taken when distributing smaller movies. I'm really not interested in selling the rights to the movie to somebody for no money and then at best, getting a bullshit release, but more than likely, not getting one at all. We set out to make an interesting movie because we were excited about making movies, and I think we should take the same approach in the release and do it in an interesting way that we're excited about. Let's rattle the cage a bit even if it means we don't make back quite as much money.The opportunity to shake things up is worth whatever the shortfall is. That's the cost of doing it the right way -- you taught me that on the first Range Life tour, and just like with those films, creating exposure and getting the movie to a wider audience is our only priority right now. What better way to accomplish that than making it free and making it accessible to literally anyone with an internet connection.

2. Speaking of the internet, it's awesome. I spend most of my time on the internet and it's where I learned much of what I know about filmmaking, and I know for a fact that's even truer of you, and it's where both of us have connected with the majority of our audiences.It's where we both live, and I think that's true of a lot of people, especially ones that will like this film. You took your movie to college campuses because that was your wheelhouse and that's where your target audience was. Same goes for this one and the internet. Quite simply, this is where my movie belongs, we just took a roundabout way of getting here.

3. And if we agree that it should be on-line, then I know we both agree it should be free. Cause that's what the internet is all about. And I think the fact that this movie didn't cost us a ton to make puts us in a unique position that we have a bit more freedom to be adventurous when rolling this out. We've made back enough of the money that even if we don't make another dollar on it and none of the people who watch it on-line buy a DVD, or make a donation, or give us their money in some other way, it won't be much of a loss.

4. This movie is the product of the crowd sourced, internet 2.0, 'other buzz word' culture of the internet through and through. We raised money on Kickstarter, garnered an audience and fan base on Tumblr and Reddit connected with fans on tour through Twitter and Facebook, and if Google+ made any sense, I'm sure we'd find a way to utilize that too. Now it seems fitting to stay true to that spirit and bring it all back full circle and put this motherfucker on Vimeo or YouTube right?

5. One of the other major benefits of putting it online is that we can reach people all over as opposed to a traditional release of a smaller film like this, which would in a best case scenario play 3-5 markets? If that? We probably wouldn't do any screenings in Scottsdale, AZ but the residents there are crying out to see this movie (Maybe)(Probably not)(THEY COULD BE THOUGH). And even if we continued touring, how many colleges can we hit before it's not worth the work anymore? Let's buck the trend and not just focus on major cities. OR college campuses. OR both. Let's get EVERYONE

6. We can have the option for people to donate money if they so feel inclined. We can't do that at Target, or on Comcast, or at the multiplex. I know we're both big fans of bands that have done this and I don't see why it's not more prevalent in film. It should be as unobtrusive and nag-free as possible, just a button somewhere below the video that's quietly sitting there. I really think that if we give the movie away for free that people will respond to it and if they like the movie maybe they'll chip in a few bucks or whatever they feel it's worth. Did you read the Chris Anderson book "Free" that I told you about? He outlines pretty eloquently how in the past when artists have given their product away for free that it's worked out fantastically.

7. Torrents. Piracy is viewed as a huge problem in the film industry but what if we turn it into a boon? If you go on Pirate Bay there are over 10,000 people who are currently downloading The Hunger Games, who I'm sure the studios view as villains but we should view them as potential audience members. They're our friends! This is a huge untapped group that I think it would be a mistake to ignore. They're going to download movies no matter what we do, so we should at least provide them with OUR movie to download and watch versus one of the other ones. Let's put a super hi res version of the movie on torrent sites and try to get something from them. An email address, a donation, a DVD sale or them blogging or tweeting about it or using that X-Box headset thingy to tell their Halo friends about it. That's better than nothing.

That's all I got for now.I don't think nearly enough filmmakers have explored this option and it would be exciting to try it out. Let's talk about it more at the batting cages.

P.S. Let's start going to the batting cages.

Please watch Incredibly Small for free on Vimeo

And please share it with other is if you enjoy it.

And please help us find some batting cages.

INCREDIBLY SMALL - Free Independent Feature Film from Dean Peterson on Vimeo.


Dean Peterson grew up in Minneapolis, MN and has studied film in New York, Paris, and Chicago, where he received his BA from Columbia College. He was an official participant at the Berlinale Talent Campus as well as the Adobe Reel Ideas Studio at the Cannes Film Festival. His short films have played in festivals around the U.S as well as in France. His interests include but are not limited to: black coffee, Siberian Huskies and twirling pens on his finger. Incredibly Small is his first feature.

Todd Sklar loves coffee. In 1994, Sklar won Best Blocked Shots in his youth basketball league. In 2007, he wrote & directed his feature length debut, BOX ELDER, which developed a cult following after Sklar & his comrades toured the film across the country throughout 2008 & 2009. Afterwards, Sklar founded Range Life Entertainment, a privately held marketing company that tours independent films to college campuses on a quarterly basis. His latest short film, '92 SKYBOX ALONZO MOURNING ROOKIE CARD premiered at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival and serves as a prologue to the upcoming feature, AWFUL NICE, which recently finished filming.

2012 Vimeo Festival + Awards Announces Tickets, Judges & Schedule

2012 VIMEO FESTIVAL + AWARDS PROGRAM GATHERS THE GREATS TO EXPLORE WHAT'S NEXT FOR CREATIVE VIDEO

Tickets Now Available; Awards Voting Open To The Public;
Complete List of Judges Released, Including Peter Greenaway, Mike Figgis, Casey Neistat And Alana Blanchard
Vimeo®, an operating business of IAC [NASDAQ: IACI], today announced its program for the 2012 Vimeo Festival + Awards, featuring conversations with industry leaders; educational workshops for beginners, enthusiasts, and professionals; and a wide range of video screenings. Vimeo also released the complete list of Awards judges and opened up shortlist voting to the public.
“There has never been a better time to be creator,” said Jeremy Boxer, Director of the Vimeo Festival + Awards. “The Internet has created a leveled playing field, so that now everyone can fundraise, shoot, edit, and distribute their projects. What's next for online video? Well, that's what we will be exploring at this year's festival with the help of our awesome speakers. We have designed the festival to have something for everyone from any level of experience. Now that the barrier to entry has come crashing down perhaps we can find new creators with ideas yet to be seen and encourage so many others to start using their imagination so they too can start to create."
The Vimeo Festival + Awards will take place on June 7-9, 2012, in New York City at the Vimeo HQ and surrounding area. Film and video luminaries such as Mike Figgis, Ted Hope, Kyle Cooper, and Lucy Walker, will gather to address critical themes such as storytelling, creativity, building an audience and fundraising. Vimeo will host screenings of the winning videos and premiere work including Limbo, a new film by 2010 Grand Prize Winner Eliot Rausch, made using grant money from his award.
Festival highlights include:
Attendees can participate in a variety of workshops that cater to all ability levels — including:
·         Animation Creation Station, Audience Participation with Andy Bruntel, Sean Pecknold and Kirsten Lepore;
·         Beginning for Beginners with Vimeo’s Dan Hayek;
·         Digi Bootcamp – Featuring The Sloth Invasion! with Lucy Cooke and Shooting People's Ingrid Kopp;
·         Impossible Things On A Shoestring with Josh Ruben and Vincent Peone;
·         Proactive Storytelling Instead Of Reactive Coverage with Stillmotion;
·         The Right Camera for the Right Job with Philip Bloom;
·         Sound: The Other Half Of Your Video with Michael Coleman;
·         The Self-Expression Tsunami with Casey Neistat;
·         Vimeo Tips & Tricks;
·         Vimeo Developer Workshops; and many more.
The event will kick off with the Vimeo Awards show, held on June 7 at NYU Skirball Center, where Vimeo will recognize the best videos online by revealing the 2012 winners. The show will combine innovative projection, staging, sound, and sensory-reactive technologies with live performances and special surprises.
Attendees of the Vimeo Festival can choose from a two-day ticket package (including access to Closing Night Party) for $60, a one-day package for $40, or a screening pass for $20. A limited number of tickets to the Awards show are available for $25 each atvimeo.com/awards/tickets.
Newly announced judges for the 2012 Vimeo Awards include professional surfer Alana Blanchard in the Action Sports category, acclaimed directors/producers Mike FiggisPeter Greenaway in Experimental, and Casey Neistat in Narrative. See the complete list of judges atvimeo.com/awards/judges.
In addition, the public-voting phase for the Vimeo Awards begins today. Video enthusiasts throughout the world are encouraged to vote online at www.vimeoawards.com. Each category will be evaluated by a mix of industry experts in that category and the category winner from the 2010 Awards, taking into account the community vote. Voting closes on April 30, 2012.
For additional information, visit the Vimeo Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/Vimeo) or follow Vimeo on Twitter (@Vimeo and @VimeoFestAwards). The official hashtag for the 2012 Vimeo Festival + Awards is #VimeoFest.

Blake Whitman on "How To Find Music To Use Legally In Videos (Announcing Vimeo's New Music Store)"

The world keeps getting better and better -- at least in terms how we can create better work and get it seen. Today, has brought some more good news. Blake Whitman, Vimeo's VP of Creative Development, announces Vimeo's New Music Store:

In addition to being Vimeo’s VP of Creative Development, I also make videos. Something that I’ve been struggling with for a while now, is how to find music that I can legally use in my videos. I search and search and search every music related site on the net and it ends up taking WAY too much of my time. And even when I find that needle in the haystack, figuring out how to actually use the song (legally that is) is a whole other story. Do I contact the musician? The label? Do I need an attorney and who's going to pay for that?!

So we had an idea. Wouldn’t it be great to create a place on Vimeo to easily discover, license and download music? Well, the obvious answer is OF COURSE, but we wanted to make sure it would be easy and intuitive to use. So we decided to create Music Store, a music library powered by two great curated music providers, Audiosocket and the Free Music Archive. The library allows anyone to search tracks by lots of different criteria and provides license agreements right there on the site. You can purchase and/or download music easily and then throw it in an editor and start editing!

Check the key features:

     • Over 45,000 songs

     •Three types of licenses: 1) Creative Commons licenses which are free (yes free), 2) Personal use, Non-commercial, web-use licenses for the casual user which are $1.99 per track; and 3) Commercial, web-use licenses for professional users which are $98 per track.

     •Searchable by over 100 features like tempo, mood, theme, genre and instrumentation

Vimeo’s mission is to inspire and empower video creators. Vimeo Music Store is just another step in our effort to help people make better videos! Check it out here:

Come Spend Some Time With Brian & Me

Three months ago, Vimeo reached out to me & Brian Newman, inviting us to have a conversation offering our perspectives on the state of the film business. Brian is a smart and engaging guy. Me, on the other hand.... Well, if you have an hour come join us here. If you just have ten minutes, you can check out Vimeo's view of the highlights below:

Making it Happen (Highlights) from Vimeo Festival on Vimeo.

A Great Number Of Impressive Films: The Vimeo Award

Vimeo Awards- Narrative Category from Vimeo Festival on Vimeo.

As I've mentioned before, I got to be one of the judges for The Vimeo Awards this year. All of the 20 finalist films were worth watching. And it was a total pleasure to discuss them with fellow judges and hear the passion for the work, even when we disagreed. Check them out, particularly these final five and let me know if you agree, and why (or why not).