Secrets Revealed! Hal Hartley On The Lessons Of THE UNBELIEVABLE TRUTH

Today, the 20th Anniversary edition of THE UNBELIEVABLE TRUTH becomes available.  You can order it here on director Hal Hartley's website.  This little film, put in the can for around $55K, and finished for about $125K, launched many a career (Hal, Adrienne Shelly, Edie Falco, Robert John Burke, Kelly Reichardt, Nick Gomez, Danny Liener, Bob Gosse, Whitney Ransick, Mike Spiller, Sarah Cawley, Chris Rogers and many more).  It changed my perspective on getting things done, on not waiting for others' acceptance or approval, and to instead use the power and will we all need to maintain.  I am confident it holds many lessons still for us all and am eager to leap into it again.  But what does it's creator have to say?   Hal speaks:

A friend asks me what, after twenty-two years, I might have learned (or not learned) from making my first feature film, The Unbelievable Truth, in 1988. What did I learn? The same thing I always learn (borrowing from Henry Miller): make films the way you like and die happy. What didn't I learn? Everything. That's why I'm still at it, I suppose.

Talking About The Early Days: Hartley, Gondry, Field, Puccini & Berman, and Motolla

Okay, this is also about talking these days too, but I didn't know how to put that into the headline.

I was interviewed on Wednesday by Aaron Aradilis for his BlogTalkRadio show "Back By Midnight" on the occasion of the DVD release of ADVENTURELAND. Martin Starr precedes me so that give you ample reason to tune in, but if you need more Anthony quizzed me on the big questions like why I wanted to make me movies in the first place. We cover Hal Hartley's early films, and the current state of indie film of course. We go into why it was obvious that Michel Gondry, Todd Field, and Puccini & Berman were obvious artists to back for their first narrative features. We even hit the state of film criticism and the crisis in print media. I guess we go on for awhile.. but of course you get to enjoy my nasal honk for most of it (and a couple good tunes off the Adventureland soundtrack).